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Pay It Forward

Tonight, I had the crazy idea to take the kids out to Applebee's Restaurant and then to our local $2 movie to see The Tooth Fairy.

With three loud (and cute) boys, we get noticed at restaurants. Some people smile, some people say the overused, yet polite saying, "You certainly have your hands full." I am sure there are others who whisper under their breath some choice words.

We were seated in the bar area of the restaurant with tables overlooking us on the next level. I had noticed one table right above us with a small baby, and I was thankful that we were near parents who may understand any noise or commotion from our table.

As we finished our meal, the waiter from the table above us came over and gave us a $20 gift card.  He said it was from a gentleman who had been sitting at the table. We quickly looked around - the table was cleared and no sign of the people. I asked if he had left his name. The waiter just said he wanted you to have this and all he knew was that they were from New York.

My husband later said he had made eye contact with the man at the table. Other than that, no other contact.

Ryan and I were shocked. This had never happened to us before. Heck, I've never had a stranger buy me a drink from across a bar during my single days.

I asked Ryan to run to the parking lot to thank them, but we knew it was too late and it seemed that they wanted to remain anonymous.

I will take my opportunity here to thank these lovely people. Thank you, dear friends, for reaching out to us in your own way. We appreciate the thought, the kindness and the risk you took in carrying out the gesture. It made us as a family feel special.

And I already know how we will pay it forward.

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